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Folly and Malice
51Cvcmz9GnL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_
Subtitle The Habsburg Empire, the Balkans and the Start of World War One
By John Zametica
Published By

Shepheard-Walwyn

ISBN 9780856835131
Non Fiction Genre History
Publication Date 06/28/2017
Price 27.95
Hardcopy Hyperlink https://www.shepheard-walwyn.co.uk/product/folly-and-malice-habsburg-first-world-war-one/

Synopsis

Various interpretations characterise the debate about the circumstances which led to the First World War. John Zametica´s work stands out because he has been able to resolve questions that have successfully eluded generations of his predecessors. He presents a new picture of the events that led to the Archduke’s assassination.

Author's Bio

John Zametica is the editor of ‘British Officials and British Foreign Policy, 1945-50’ (Leicester University Press, 1990) and the author of ‘The Yugoslav Conflict’ (Brassey´s, The International Institute for Strategic Studies, 1992). He lives and works in Montenegro.

Reviews

“seminal work which forces readers to reflect further on issues they had thought settled … [its] conclusions will be carefully studied by historians for many years.” Vernon Bogdanor, International Affairs

“This painstaking and meticulous piece of scholarship offers a challenge to some widely-held assumptions about the events which led up to the outbreak of [WW1].” Trevor James, The Historian

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3 Comments

  1. Comment
    A riveting read – nowadays surrounded by war or the threat of war, John Zametica’s work resolves questions about the debate as to the circumstances which led to the First World War.

  2. A thorough analysis of the background of events that were the main cause of the war based on dedicated research, revealing little published facts. The bibliography includes sources not often or never quoted on the subject.

  3. This book definitively exposes its WW1 centenary predecessors (eg Clark’s Sleepwalkers) as being a lot of hot air

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